Structure and Methodology

This section contains information about the Structure and Methodology of our Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme.

We advise prospective applicants of the IGCBP 2011 to read the following sections.


1. Course structure and benefits

2. Web 2.0 e-learning platform

3. Working language

4. Requirements

5. Target participants


1. Course structure and benefits

The courses offered under the Foundation, Advanced, and Research Phases (including the ICT Strategy course offered in 2011) are conducted online. Access to the Internet is therefore needed. All interactions are text-based, so in most cases a dial-up Internet connection is sufficient.

Most course activities can be completed whenever it is convenient for the participant, within a given weekly schedule. Real-time (synchronous) online interaction (attending online chat sessions) takes place once a week. This gives participants the opportunity to ‘meet’ and discuss the issues with fellow participants and tutors.

The courses include studying and discussing textual materials under the guidance of experienced tutors and the support of topic experts. Tutors are also able to offer platform assistance throughout the course, with the support of a dedicated tech team.

Successful students are awarded a DiploFoundation certificate for the respective course, and will become members of Diplo’s Alumni. Participants are also invited to join Diplo’s global Internet governance online community of over 1,000 members.


2. Web 2.0 e-learning platform

Learning and knowledge-sharing takes place on a web-based virtual classroom with Web 2.0 interactive tools. 

The platform includes the use of a hypertext discussion system, blog message board, forum discussions, real-time discussion sessions, and other important features.


3. Working language

Unless the description for a specific course states otherwise, the course materials, our e-learning platform, and the working language of the course is in English. We ask applicants to consider whether their reading and writing skills in English are sufficient to follow university-level materials and discussion.

Applicants to the bilingual groups (English and French) are asked to note that both languages are considered working languages within these groups. Reading and writing skills in English must be sufficient to understand learning materials and instructions, and for basic communication and interaction.

Reading and writing skills in the second language must be sufficient for discussion and research purposes. 


4. Requirements 

Unless a course states otherwise, we expect participants:

  • To be able to dedicate at least 8 hours per week to the learning phase of the course. Participants are generally requested to read weekly materials, contribute to the discussions, and respond to questions and comments posted by tutors and fellow participants. At times, participants will be required to join forum discussions and weekly real-time discussion sessions, as well as to search for additional relevant sources of information to share and discuss with their groups. A final, narrative exam may be given to assess the level of understanding of issues covered.
  • To have good reading and writing skills in English (or in the working language of the course, if the course is conducted in a language other than English), sufficient to follow university-level materials and discussion. It is also important for participants to be able to summarise information and focus on details.
  • To have basic awareness and interest in issues related to the Information Society, ICT, and Internet governance
  • To have regular access to the Internet (dial-up connection is sufficient).


5. Target participants

We would love to have everyone on board! We are, however, particularly interested in professionals, from both developed and developing countries, who are:

  • officials in government ministries and departments dealing with Information Society, Internet and ICT-related policy issues (e.g. telecommunications, education, foreign affairs, justice);
  • officials in regulatory authorities or institutions dealing with Information Society, Internet, and ICT-related issues;
  • post-graduate students, academics, and researchers in the Internet governance field (e.g. in telecommunications, electrical engineering, law, economics, development studies);
  • civil society activists in the Internet governance and Information Society fields;
  • journalists covering Internet governance issues; and
  • individuals in Internet-business fields (e.g. ISPs, software developers).